Category Archives: Nourishing Traditions

Crustless Sausage Egg and Cheese Quiche

I hope everyone has a wonderful time with family and friends and safe holiday weekend; we sure did! On Thursday morning, I made a quiche for breakfast. My mom and I always experiment with new recipes on company – this holiday was no different.

I needed something for breakfast and was looking for something quick and easy. However, I didn’t want to make everyone feel like they had to eat something SCD made with tons of almond flour. Google searches turned up a couple interesting options for ‘crustless‘ quiche… I thought it might have some potential.

So, I gave it a whirl…!

crustless quiche cooked

The overall result was quite delicious! Most important, it was amazingly easy! You can even cook the sausage and grate the cheese the night before to cut down on prep time…

I tried to season my own breakfast sausage. That recipe still needs a little work. Hopefully, I’ll get to post that sometime soon.

For now, here is a great breakfast recipe for a crowd or just yourself! (It even reheats well).

crustless quiche

SAUSAGE, EGG AND CHEESE QUICHE
(inspired by yummly.com)

10 Large eggs
1/3C almond milk
1/2tsp onion powder
1tsp sea salt
1/2tsp pepper
1 1/2TBSP dijon mustard
1 1/2C cheddar cheese
1lb sausage – cooked
1C cherry tomatoes – quartered
1/2C scallions/green onions – sliced

(OPTIONAL: I think that some sauteed vegetables would have been a great addition. Next time I make it I will also include 1/2C diced onions, 1/4C diced mushrooms, 1/2C diced green or red bell pepper. Saute in 2TBSP butter until soft and most of the water has evaporated.)

Preheat oven to 350degrees. Butter 9.5inch pie plate.
In a large bowl, mix eggs, milk, onion powder and mustard – whisk to combine. Add cheese and stir gently. Evenly spread cooked sausage (and optional sauteed vegetables) in bottom of prepared pan. Pour egg mixture in pan over sausage/veggies.

Bake 45-50mins. Serve warm and top with cherry tomatoes and scallions for a fresh taste with a little crunch!

Enjoy!

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“Mock”-sgiving: SCD Pecan Pie!!

“Anything worth doing, is worth doing right.”
-Hunter S. Thompson

Still trying to get ready for Thanksgiving.

I’ve been mulling over some thoughts on an SCD pecan pie for a couple weeks now. I found a couple recipes via Google search, but had some personal issues with the amount of honey they require (some up to 1  1/2C!). With my hypoglycemic issues, its important not to cause BIG spikes in my blood sugar. Second, honey can be a bit intense and over powering. It is pecan pie after all.

The husband and I like LARA bars. They are made entirely of fruit and nuts and the only prepackaged food I’ve found that fits into the SCD (lemon is my favorite!). The primary ingredient in most of the bars is dates. That got me thinking…

Could we incorporate dates into the filling and reduce the honey?

As it turns out – Yes, we can! It’s not the simplest recipe, but it’s definitely worth it in the end.

I got the recipe for the pie crust from my new cookbook, Grain-Free Gourmet. It works well – reminiscent of a graham cracker crust. I think next time I’d make some small changes, but I’ll write about that when/if I actually do it.

First things first: Soaking nuts. It is really important to prepare foods to increase your ability to digest them. By soaking raw nuts, you remove a majority of the tannins and decrease the phytates and inhibiting enzymes that can cause digestive distress. Plus, it makes them taste so much better.

They will stay good for 2-3 days after soaking. If you plan to prepare a large quantity, I’d recommend that you also dry them after soaking.

SOAKED NUTS
Nourishing Traditions (Fallon) – link in Resources

1C nuts (in this case Pecans)
2C filtered water
1/2tsp sea salt (see post on sea salt here.)

Combine ingredients in jar, shake well and leave on counter overnight. Drain and rinse well. Refrigerate for 2-3 days or dehydrate at 105degrees for 10-12 hours.

PIE CRUST
Grain-Free Gourmet (Bager & Lass, 2010)

Makes 1 9″ pie crust
1 1/2C almond flour
3TBSP butter (cold, cut in pieces)
2TBSP honey [I only used 1TBSP]
1/8tsp baking soda
1/4tsp salt

Preheat oven to 300degrees. Combine all ingredients. Using pastry cutter or food processor, cut in butter or pulse until it begins to form a ball. Place dough ball between 2 pieces of plastic wrap/parchment and roll out to 11″ round. Place on sheet pan and refrigerate for minimum of 15mins. Remove from fridge and peel off one side of plastic wrap. Working quickly, invert pastry round into pie plate and peel off remaining plastic. Patch any holes. Dock crust with a fork. Bake for 10 to 15mins until it just starts to brown. Set aside.

pie crust doughpie crust rolledpie crust panpie crust dockedpie crust bakeddates and honeydates and eggsdates and pecanspie crust filled

PECAN PIE 

1C pitted dates (heaping)
1 1/4C filtered water
1/2C honey
3TBSP butter
3 eggs – lightly beaten
1/2tsp vanilla
1tsp salt
2C soaked pecans (roughly chopped)

Combine dates and water in saucepan and soak for 1hour.
Turn heat on medium and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 20mins with lid on. (optional: remove some of the floating skins, not necessary, they just bothered me). Pour into blender (be careful, it is hot after all) and puree until smooth. Return to sauce pan and add honey. Bring mixture back to a simmer – stirring constantly – for 5 mins. Remove from heat, add butter and stir to combine. Set aside until mixture is cool to the touch and has thickened. Add eggs, vanilla and salt to date/honey mixture – stir to combine then add in pecans. Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake at 300degrees for 40 to 50mins. When you shake the pie pan the mixture should barely shake/jiggle in the center. Remove from oven and cool.

and the finished pie! ta-daa!

pecan pie plated

The husband, who is not usually a huge fan of pecan pie, loves it! Give it a try. Please let me know what you think!!!

Black Beans with a Kick!

A couple weeks ago, the husband and I went out for a quick anniversary dinner. We decided to be frugal and use a gift card we’d been meaning to use for Chili’s restaurant. I had gone online a few days prior to see what sort of gluten/grain/refined sugar-free stuff they might have. It can be very challenging finding foods that meet all the limitations. I was pleasantly surprised to find an extensive PDF of allergy information. You can find it here.bbingredients

I got a grilled steak and shrimp combo with a side of broccoli and black beans. I had not had black beans in a really long time and thought they’d be a nice change. Boy was I right. I’ve been thinking about those black beans for 2 weeks now. This week I finally got around to making them.

Following the directions for cooking black beans in Nourishing Traditions, I mixed my dry beans to soak.
bbmixedupbb12hrsoak
The photo on the left is immediately after mixing; photo on the right is after 12 hours of soaking.

According to Nourishing Traditions (pages 495-496), legumes must be prepared carefully to “neutralize phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors” and make them easier to digest.

To prepare black beans: Combine 1 Cup dry beans, 2 Cups filtered water and 1 TBSP lemon juice (or whey). Allow beans to soak 12-24hours. Drain and rinse beans. Add beans to 2Qt pan and cover with 6 Cups water. Bring to boil and skim off foam. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 4-8 hours. Add water as necessary.
Note: Be gentle when stirring beans, they will break down easily.

BLACK BEANS

Prepared black beans
2tsp Chili powder
1/2tsp cumin
1/2tsp garlic powder
1tsp honey
1 fresh jalapeno, diced
1TBSP fresh garlic
salt/pepper to taste
1TBSP butter

Toppings: fresh diced tomatoes, red onions and cilantro

When the black beans are finished cooking and start getting a little thick, add the spices, jalapeno, garlic and butter. [You can leave out the jalapeno completely if you don’t like too much spice, or grade the intensity by leaving out some of the seeds.] Cook for another 30mins, adding water as needed for consistency.

Top as desired and serve warm.

bbfinished

yum! These are a bit of work, but so worth it! Enjoy!

Why is there SUGAR in my SALT!?

sugar in salt

According to the medical dictionary, dextrose is a monosaccharide and the outdated name for glucose (now referred to as d-glucose).

I’ve become a label Nazi over the past 2 months. I’m amazed at the ingredients I glossed over prior to starting the SCD. Likely because the names were so long and I couldn’t pronounce them…. My how things change.

As I was cleaning out my cabinets the other day, I was glancing at the labels. You could have knocked me over, I was so stunned to see dextrose on the label of my salt.

When you go to Morton’s website FAQ page, they address the issue of dextrose:
“In 1924 Morton became the first company to produce iodized salt for the table in order to reduce the incidence of simple goiter. Dextrose is added to stabilize the iodide. Iodine is vital to the proper functioning of the thyroid gland and the prevention of goiter. Actually, the amount of dextrose in salt is so small that it is dietetically insignificant. Morton® Iodized Table Salt contains 0.04 percent dextrose or 40 milligrams per 100 grams of salt. Morton® Plain Table Salt contains neither iodine nor dextrose. All Morton Salt products containing potassium iodide are labeled as such.”

huh. Well, while it may be insignificant to your calorie intake, when you’ve got gut issues you can’t take any chances.

I went back to a book, Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, to refresh my memory on iodine and sea salt. It has become one of my main go to books for nutritional questions. She does a great job of breaking down the technical parts.

On page 44, she states that iodine is essential for “fat metabolism, thyroid function and the production of sex hormones”. One’s iodine requirements may vary based on where your ancestors are from (coastal – needs more) and requires Vitamin A for absorption. Also, too much can be toxic.

She continues on pages 48 and 49, “Most discussions of salt ignore the issue of salt processing. Few people realize that our salt – like our sugar, flour and vegetable oils – is highly refined; it is the product of a chemical and high-temperature industrial process that removes all the valuable magnesium salts as well as trace minerals naturally occurring in the sea. To keep salt dry, salt refiners adulterate this “pure” product with several harmful additives, including aluminum compounds. To replace the natural iodine salts that are removed during processing, potassium iodide is added in amounts that can be toxic. To stabilize the volatile iodine compound, processors add dextrose which turns the iodized salt a purplish color. A bleaching agent is then necessary to restore whiteness to the salt… Even most so-called sea salt is produced by industrial methods”.

Really? What the heck! She suggests that you buy the purest form, unrefined sea salt from the salt marshes in the Celtic region. It contains natural iodine from  marine life and is a light gray color (naturally).

If you don’t have the book, I highly recommend it. You can also find it in my Good Reads section. As for me, I’ll be buying some different sea salt this weekend…